The Crew 2 Closed Beta PS4Pro HDR 1080p60

Die Closed Beta von The Crew 2 wurde glücklicherweise zum Streamen freigegeben (stand in den FAQ), deshalb hier die Aufzeichnung des Livestreams zum Auftakt der Closed Beta vom 31.05.2018 10:00 – 04.06.2018 10:00 mit Events aus den 4 Kategorien, Live-Wechsel des Untersatzes und Fotomodus mit DEM BÄR! 😀

The Crew 2 auf Amazon kaufen*: amzn.to/2suFrjq

Der Open World Racer The Crew 2 erscheint am 29. Juni 2018 für PC, PS4, Xbox One – Vorbesteller erhalten ein Fahrzeug-Paket.

*Bei dem verwendeten Link handelt es sich um einen Affiliate Link. Durch einen Kauf über den Link werde ich am Umsatz beteiligt. Dies hat für Dich keine Auswirkungen auf den Preis.

via YouTube The Crew 2 Closed Beta PS4Pro HDR 1080p60

The Crew 2 Closed Beta PS4Pro HDR 1080p60

Die Closed Beta von The Crew 2 wurde glücklicherweise zum Streamen freigegeben (stand in den FAQ), deshalb hier die Aufzeichnung des Livestreams zum Auftakt der Closed Beta vom 31.05.2018 10:00 – 04.06.2018 10:00 mit Events aus den 4 Kategorien, Live-Wechsel des Untersatzes und Fotomodus mit DEM BÄR! 😀

The Crew 2 auf Amazon kaufen*: amzn.to/2suFrjq

Der Open World Racer The Crew 2 erscheint am 29. Juni 2018 für PC, PS4, Xbox One – Vorbesteller erhalten ein Fahrzeug-Paket.

*Bei dem verwendeten Link handelt es sich um einen Affiliate Link. Durch einen Kauf über den Link werde ich am Umsatz beteiligt. Dies hat für Dich keine Auswirkungen auf den Preis.

via YouTube The Crew 2 Closed Beta PS4Pro HDR 1080p60

Liked on YouTube: Intel’s Processor Naming Scheme Explained

Intel has eight different families of processors including its Core processors, Xeon, Atom, Pentium and Celeron! That is a lot of different processors. Then once you drill down into these families there are different series and generations like the i3, i5, i7 and i9. Is it possible to understanding Intel’s naming scheme? Let’s try!

Twitter: twitter.com/garyexplains
Instagram: ift.tt/2GwvXNL

via YouTube Intel’s Processor Naming Scheme Explained

Liked on YouTube: Easter Eggs in Spielen – Folge #1 mit God of War, A Way Out & Need for Speed von 1994

Spiele für Steam, Uplay und Co. jetzt digital bei Gamesplanet.com kaufen: bit.ly/2of1MR0 (Werbung)
Über 1.400 exklusive Videos gibt‘s bei GameStar Plus: bit.ly/2uU529W
Easter Eggs in Spielen. Das sind kleine Geheimnisse,die die Entwickler versteckt haben, mal als Scherz, mal als Hommage oder Würdigung. In dieser Video-Reihe zeigt unser Redakteur Christian Fritz Schneider jede Woche drei Easter Eggs, die er im Netz gefunden hat. Mit dabei sind aktuelle Titel und Spiele-Klassiker, beispielsweise das erste Need for Speed von 1994, das damals noch The Need for Speed hieß.
Viel Spaß mit der ersten Folge des neuen Videoformats auf GameStar.de und GamePro.de.
Und hier noch die Links, die für das God-of-War-Easter Egg. Auf Gamez.de (ift.tt/2xixWSj) gibt es einen geschriebenen Guide, der euch verrät, wie ihr den mächtigen Handschuh bekommt. IGN (www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHjVWT5Nw8E) hat das Easter Egg zudem im Detail erklärt und auch den Weg dorthin.
Wir freuen uns auf Feedback und Easter-Egg-Vorschläge.
A Way Out (PC) auf GameStar.de: ift.tt/2sb7Hbp
God of War 4 (PS4) auf GamePro.de: ift.tt/2GWhoEn
Need for Speed, The (PC) auf GameStar.de: ift.tt/2sb7F3h
Need for Speed, The (PS1) auf GamePro.de: ift.tt/2xjxCTs
A Way Out (PS4) auf GamePro.de: ift.tt/2saLD0y
A Way Out (Xbox One) auf GamePro.de: ift.tt/2xhjgTF
GameStar auf Facebook: ift.tt/2DY2uHa
GameStar bei Twitter: twitter.com/gamestar_de

via YouTube Easter Eggs in Spielen – Folge #1 mit God of War, A Way Out & Need for Speed von 1994

Liked on YouTube: Google AIY Kits for Experimenting with Artificial Intelligence

We learn about Google’s AIY voice and vision kits at this year’s Maker Faire, and check out a few projects that make use of the kits’ artificial intelligence capabilities. The vision kit, in particular, impressed us with its ability to recognize objects, faces, and even emotions.

Shot by Gunther Kirsch and edited by Norman Chan

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Tested is:
Adam Savage www.twitter.com/donttrythis
Norman Chan www.twitter.com/nchan
Simone Giertz www.twitter.com/simonegiertz
Joey Fameli www.twitter.com/joeyfameli
Kishore Hari www.twitter.com/sciencequiche
Sean Charlesworth www.twitter.com/cworthdynamics
Jeremy Williams www.twitter.com/jerware
Ariel Waldman www.twitter.com/arielwaldman
Kayte Sabicer twitter.com/kaytesabicer
Bill Doran twitter.com/chinbeard
Gunther Kirsch
Ryan Kiser
Kristen Lomasney

Set design by Danica Johnson www.twitter.com/saysdanica

Thanks for watching!

via YouTube Google AIY Kits for Experimenting with Artificial Intelligence

Liked on YouTube: The Apple Store Genius Bar Broke My $5,000 iMac Pro

Getting your iMac Pro repaired is even harder than expected…

Apple’s new iMac Pro is a $5,000+ machine but many users are reporting that Apple Support isn’t servicing them—even under warranty. They repaired ours, but the Genius Bar destroyed it in the process. What a disaster!

Follow me on Twitter – twitter.com/snazzyq
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via YouTube The Apple Store Genius Bar Broke My $5,000 iMac Pro

Liked on YouTube: Simplest solar light possible, using old phone battery.

This is a different twist to a super-simple solar charge lighting circuit. I’ve never used reverse leakage current through a solar panel in this way before, but it seems to work.
The project uses a cheap eBay solar panel (5 or 6V) and a standard phone lithium battery with built in protection. The charge current is limited purely by what the solar panel can deliver, in this case about 100 to 200mA. The intensity of the LEDs will depend on the value of the series resistor and the transistor’s base resistor. The unit is more intended for decorative use than area lighting.
I built a similar circuit years ago and use it to drive a string of meteor lights. They’re still going strong years later and even work well into the night in winter.
I’m wondering how consistent the reverse leakage current from the solar panel will be between panels. It seems common enough to require the inclusion of a reverse discharge diode in most solar chargers.
The component list is:
Nokia or other protected phone battery.
Solar panel from eBay 5 or 6V 500mA output max (100ma is fine).
1N4001 1A diode. (or any from the 1N400X range)
10 ohm resistor to limit LED current.
10K resistor for transistor base, adjust if needed.
BC547 or any other similar NPN transistor with high gain.
Double sided foam tape and some insulated wire.
Some LEDs, Parallel LED string, meteor lights or whatever you want to run.

Keep in mind that the cell may have a charge while building the circuit, so be careful not to short it out, although it should have overcurrent protection if you do.

This circuit is intended for low current LED loads only.

If you enjoy these videos you can help support the channel with a dollar for coffee, cookies and random gadgets for disassembly at:-
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This also keeps the channel independent of YouTube’s advertising algorithms allowing it to be a bit more dangerous and naughty.

via YouTube Simplest solar light possible, using old phone battery.

Liked on YouTube: Solder testing (and candy).

A while ago I was sent some bits of solder by Oskar and Ragnar in Iceland. They had been using old solder successfully, but when they tried some stuff from an eBay listing it was poor quality. They got some new stuff from a local electronics supplier and it was fine.
Here are some random tests of that solder and others.

If you enjoy these videos you can help support the channel with a dollar for coffee, cookies and random gadgets for disassembly at:-
ift.tt/28MXLZC
This also keeps the channel independent of YouTube’s advertising algorithms allowing it to be a bit more dangerous and naughty.

via YouTube Solder testing (and candy).

Liked on YouTube: ⚫ How The Black Point Message Crashes Android Apps

“_If you touch the👇black point then your whatsapp will hang_”, says the message that’s being sent around, and it’s right. It’s a text rendering bug, the same as many others — which isn’t interesting. But the characters it’s using, Unicode RTL and LTR marks, are worth knowing about.

Thanks to everyone who suggested this subject!

The Unicode Bidirectional Algorithm: ift.tt/1RlWklN

I’m at tomscott.com
on Twitter at twitter.com/tomscott
on Facebook at ift.tt/15nYGyi
and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

via YouTube ⚫ How The Black Point Message Crashes Android Apps

Liked on YouTube: Actually, Android IS optimized – Gary explains

Read the article: goo.gl/20dACZ

I often see the comment, “Android isn’t optimized” or “iOS is better optimized.” Why do people say that and is it true? Gary explains!

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via YouTube Actually, Android IS optimized – Gary explains